12 Best Vegan Sausages

4 vegan chorizo sausages cooking in a frying pan with a sprig of thyme

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12 Best Vegan Sausages UK

Q. How do you make a Sausage Roll?

A. By pushing it down a hill of course.
 
And you’ll be glad to know that I don’t have any more jokes about vegan sausages, so instead, this is a serious blog about the best ones according to me and my testing team –  that’ll be me, my husband and many other random vegans (and meat-eaters) who frequent my vegan kitchen, so some well-tested products…

Vegan Sausages

With so many vegan sausages already on the market, and seemingly new ones appearing almost daily (OK, that’s a slight exaggeration, but there are lots) it’s difficult to know which ones to buy. So, I’ve put together this handy guide below to some of the best brands of vegan sausages out there. If you think I’ve missed any real gems, please just get in touch to let me know. I can count past 12…

I’ve found that, probably like meat sausages, the different types of vegan sausage serve different purposes, so in this review, I have also suggested what I consider to be the best use for each one. Of course, it is just my personal opinion and may not be what the manufacturer intended!

Vegan Chorizo Sausage

I’ve included a number of vegan chorizo sausages in my list – these have really come on recently and I love using them in some of my recipes, such as my Tasty Vegan Sausage Traybake and they go particularly well in my Vegan Paella.
 
The naming conventions forced onto vegan products really start to come into their own with the vegan chorizo sausage. It is truly ridiculous and the names end up longer than a titled landowner’s sitting in the House of Lords. I am sure the vast majority of people buying a product understand the terms ‘plant-based’, ‘vegan’ and ‘meat-free’. But I mustn’t start on that again…
 
Anyway, why not give some of these vegan sausage brands a try and see how you get on?
 
 They all taste great with my Mushroom Gravy Recipe too!

Vegan Sausage Brands

'THIS' Isn't Pork Sausages

Pack of 'This' isn't pork sausages
Credit: This.co

These 100% plant-based sausages really are fab. They are also remarkably like meat sausages so not for the faint-hearted perhaps. Using pea protein as the base, they are high in protein and fibre and are waayyyy lower than the average pork sausage in saturated fat – 80% lower according to ‘THIS’. 

When it comes to making bangers and mash with gravy, these are absolutely my go-to vegan sausages.  They have a great flavour and crisp up and brown really, really nicely in the frying pan. See my recipe for mushroom gravy – it’s perfect for these sausages.

Editor’s Rating: 4.5/5 (they lose half a point for packaging)

Pros

Cons

Richmond Meat-Free Sausages

Pack of 8 Richmond Meat Free Sausages
Credit: Richmond

I really like these sausages and meat-eaters I have cooked them for assure me they taste incredibly similar to Richmond’s meat sausages.

These are largely soya-based and are not gluten-free, but surprisingly, their nutritional profile gives ‘This’ sausages a little bit of a run for their money. 

These sausages fare well in a full fry-up and in pastry sausage rolls. But my favourite way of serving these sausages is in a hot ciabatta roll with Naturli vegan block or Flora plant b*tter and brown sauce. Not much more I can say really other than, try it…

Editor’s Rating: 4/5

Pros

Cons

Moving Mountains

Pack of Moving Mountains 6 plant based sausages
Credit: Moving Mountains

These very tasty sausages use a combination of soy and pea protein together with oyster mushrooms. 

With a pretty good nutritional profile, the only factor you may want to consider is that they are higher in fat than many of the other vegan sausages on offer. Packaged in cardboard which is great.

Without doubt, these make a great toad in the hole using a vegan yorkshire pudding batter. Other than that, a great all-rounder.

Editor’s Rating: 4.5/5

Pros

Cons

Beyond Meat's Beyond Sausage

Credit: Beyond Meat

These pea protein based sausages are gluten and soy free and pack a whopping great protein-filled punch! They are BIG too, but they don’t compromise on flavour. As mentioned, they have a good level of protein, and saturated fat is mid-range; lower than some, higher than others. 

They brown really nicely – just make sure because of their size that they are hot all the way through. Great in a sub roll with all the trimmings – ketchup, pickles, mustard… 

Normally the priciest in this list. But they are good and look out for special offers!

Editor’s Rating: 4.5/5

Pros

Cons

Meatless Farm Plant-Based Sausages

Pack of 6 Meatless Farm plant based sausages
Credit: Meatless Farm

These pea protein based sausages are gluten free as well as being high in protein. They have a calculator on their site that shows you the positive change you can make switching from meat to a Meatless Farm product.  It has some great recipes too so head over to The Meatless Farm Co website to see more. 

These are pretty popular although not everyone likes the texture and many other vegan sausage brands get more crispy when you cook them. I think that makes these good though for wrapping in pastry to make vegan sausage rolls. They’re also tasty in a toasted sandwich with some mustard and ketchup!

Editor’s Rating: 3.5/5

Pros

Cons

Linda McCartney's Vegetarian Sausages

Pack of 6 Linda McCartney Vegetarian Sausages with Vegan Society Approved logo
Credit: Linda McCartney Foods

These pea protein based sausages have a reassuringly short list of ingredients and are also a pretty healthy option, being high in protein and low in saturated fat. Although the name of the sausages suggests they are vegetarian, they are in fact vegan (although this is not true of all Linda McCartney foods, so check the labels).

I am very fond of Linda McCartney Foods in general – her cookbook saved my life when my children were little with its vegeburger stew and meatless loaf recipes (you can buy Linda McCartney’s Family Kitchen Cookbook here – I’d recommend it). But it’s not just nostalgia, these vegetarian sausages (that are vegan!) are consistently good, whichever flavour you buy. Packaged in cardboard too.

These are a great all-rounder, good for a big breakfast or in a sausage sandwich, and they are very tasty with mash and gravy. I always keep a pack in my freezer.

Editor’s Rating: 4/5

Pros

Cons

M&S Plant Kitchen 8 Vegan Sausages (Bangers)

Credit: Ocado

These soya protein based sausages are delicious. If you are concerned about fat levels and protein, then these may not be your first choice. However, if it’s a tasty vegan banger you’re after, then these fit the bill. Handy to have as a back up because they’re frozen, although packaged in plastic.

A good all rounder, I have cooked these for breakfast and in a traybake – both very successful and popular.

Editor’s Rating: 4/5

Pros

Cons

Taifun Grill Sausages

Credit: Taifun

These tofu-based sausages are a reliable source of protein and although the overall fat content is quite high, the level of saturated fat is pretty good. The ingredients list is reassuring too – no unidentifiable additives.

They are packaged in plastic, like many (but not all) of the vegan sausages on the market.

These vegan sausages remain relatively pale when cooked and also don’t have the more meaty flavour of many other alternatives. I don’t see that as a negative, but it means I tend to use them in recipes where that is not important. Try these for breakfast, or – a particular favourite – in a long white bread roll with a generous pile of sauerkraut and some mustard – heaven.

Editor’s Rating: 3.5/5

Pros

Cons

Suma Vegan Sausage Mix

A pack of Sosmix vegan sausage mix

Maybe it’s because I was born in the age of Cranks, one of only a few vegetarian restaurants that really existed back in the dark ages (in London’s Soho). Anyway, I have an inexplicable fondness for what was then seen as hippy food, the Sosmix sausage.

Feeling nostalgic? You can still buy the original Sosmix from an excellent vegan online retailer, Alternative Stores – see below. Suma (a c0-operative) do a good vegan sausage mix too and I buy mine in the wonderful Natural Foodstore in Diss, another great workers’ co-operative.

Just mix with water, shape into sausages and fry. You can add other flavourings if you like – garlic powder, onion granules, finely chopped mushrooms, bit of nutritional yeast. Heaven…

Good for pastry sausage rolls, or a fry up breakfast with plenty of tomato ketchup.

Editor’s Rating: 3/5

Pros

Cons

Vegan Chorizo Sausage Brands

M&S Plant Kitchen No Chorizo Puppies

Gluten-free, these are mushroom and soya protein based. They are higher in fibre, and lower in protein than ‘This’, but are great for recipes that uses paprika or have a Spanish theme. Pretty good on the barbecue too.

I think these Chorizo style vegan sausages are so clever. They have a firm texture and taste delicious, particularly in my Vegan Sausage Traybake recipe.

Guilty pleasure? Rolling a cooked no chorizo puppy in a rubbishy slice of buttered white bread with the crusts removed. Just don’t blame me if you get addicted…

Editor’s Rating: 4.5/5

Pros

Cons

Waitrose PlantLiving Spanish Style No Chorizo Whirls

Credit: Waitrose

Another mushroom-based offering including roasted red peppers too, and they’re very good. They have a lovely smoky paprika flavour and fare well under the grill and when fried. I haven’t tried it, but would imagine they’d barbecue nicely too.

I have tried freezing these and they were ok, but are a bit squishy when thawed so I’d recommend that you eat them fresh.

These are my favourites for my Vegan Paella recipe, just make sure you brown them first in the pan (and remove the bamboo skewer!) When serving, you can make sure that everyone gets a whole ‘whirl’ on their dish. Delicious…

Editor’s Rating: 4.5/5

Pros

Cons

Heura Plant-Based Chorizo Sausages

Credit: Heura Foods

Using soya protein and extra-virgin olive oil, these vegan chorizo sausages pack an impressive nutritional punch. They have a real chorizo-like flavour – as a company born in Barcelona in Spain, they know their stuff, obviously!

The Heura website is well worth a visit if you’re interested in food activism too. My only concern is the packaging, although they are at pains to say that it is the most eco-friendly option.

Serve these up with some sweet potato wedges, they’re delicious. I really like them. They go well in my Vegan Sausage Traybake recipe too and as you may have noticed, I’m a bit of a bread fiend and I reckon a good bread roll would also be a welcome accompaniment.

I did try them in my Vegan Paella recipe but I don’t think the recipe works for them and they went a bit soggy.

Editor’s Rating: 4/5

Pros

Cons

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